The Last Days Of Disco



All in all, The Last Days Of Disco is a movie worth the attention of anyone looking for an interesting story with interesting, real characters






The Last Days Of Disco chronicles the fall of the disco era in the early '80s. It follows a group of people that actually interesting for how shallow the are.

The main characters are Alice and Charlotte played by Chloe Sevigny and Kate Beckinsale. Alice is the smarter and more together one that unfortunately all too often listens to the babbling advice of Charlotte. They work at a book publishing house but their social life revolves around a trending disco. There we meet the rest of this group of misfits. Christopher Eigeman as Des, the floor manager of the disc that is constantly getting in trouble for letting his ad-man friend into the disco. His thing is to dump women by telling him he is gay, something he just found out while watching Wild Kingdom. The lack of depth of the conversation at the disco and elsewhere is amazing! The group actually gets into a heated debate over the archetypes found in Lady and the Tramp. Sex, drugs and music are what is one most minds in this setting. People swap relationships like so many trading cards. Amidst this is Alice, a thinking person among the virtual brain dead. Chloe Sevigney brings a great deal to this character and once again steals the show. The contrast between her and Charlotte is what drives The Last Days Of Disco. Shallow yes but it documents a shallow time. At one point Charlotte explains to Alice that VD is positive because it will increase her popularity and after all, it can easily be cured. Obviously the days just before AIDS. Strong cast, good direction by Whit Stillman and a soundtrack right out of the old discos of the time. Combined with actually interesting characters the movie is enjoyable.

The DVD is for the most part well done. There are really no added features but the video transfer is excellent. The sound, now that is something to comment upon. Your subwoofer will get a workout in The Last Days Of Disco. The pounding bass during the scenes in the club are so overwhelming you will think you are at the disco yourself. At times it was a bit too real since it made some of the dialogue almost impossible to understand.

All in all, The Last Days Of Disco is worth the attention of anyone looking for an interesting story with interesting, real characters.

Review by Doug MacLean of hometheaterinfo.com



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